Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Anger

A recent study examined anger and the role it plays in the maintenance of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD).  Researchers examined hostility, physical and verbal aggression, how anger is expressed, and how anger is controlled. More than 380 participants with GAD were tested on their responses to statements that were anger-related such as "I strike out at whatever infuriates me."  The study found that higher levels of anger were associated with worry and anxiety.  In addition, hostility and internalized anger contributed to the severity of the participants' GAD symptoms.  Thus,  internalized anger made generalized anxiety stronger.  Anger fanned the flames of worry and anxiety.  Researchers suggested that anger could be detrimental during the treatment of GAD, especially if it is not brought up and handled during the patient's therapy. 

Dr. Richards expresses it like this:  You can never get better from any of the anxiety disorders by using another negative emotion.  Any negative emotion (i.e.., anger) feeds and fuels other negative emotions (e.g.., anxiety).  So, while it may be nice to think you can get better by being angry at anxiety, in fact all it does is make anxiety worse.
 
Posted on 2/4/2013

Our History and Our Mission

The Anxiety Network began in 1995 due to growing demand from people around the world wanting help in understanding and overcoming their anxiety disorder.  The Anxiety and Stress Clinic and its website, The Anxiety Network, received so much traffic and requests for help that we found ourselves spending the majority of our time in international communication and outreach.  Our in-person anxiety clinic has grown tremendously, and our principal internet tool, The Anxiety Network, has been re-written and re-designed with focus on the major anxiety disorders.  

The Anxiety Network  focuses on three of the major anxiety disorders:  panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder,  and social anxiety disorder.

In 1997, The Social Anxiety Association, a non-profit organization, was formed and has its own website.

The Social Anxiety Institute, the largest site on the internet for information and treatment of social anxiety, has maintained an active website since 1998.  Continuous, ongoing therapy groups have helped hundreds of people overcome social anxiety since 1994.  Major changes in design will be occurring in 2014.

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